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URGENT NOTICE TO WASHINGTON STATE WASTE TREATMENT SYSTEM OWNERS

Here is the Proposed No Discharge Zone Map

Type 1 Treatment

(65' Vessel & Under)

A flow through discharge device that, under the test conditions described in 33 CFR 159.121,
produces effluent having a fecal coliform bacteria count no greater than 1000/100 milliliters,
and no visible floating solids.
A Type 1 MSD is commonly a physical / chemical type (macerator / chlorinator.).

Type II Treatment
(65' Vessel & Larger)

A flow through discharge device that, under the test conditions described in 33 CFR 159.121,
produces effluent having a fecal coliform bacteria count no greater than 200/100 milliliters,
and suspended solids no greater than 150 milligrams/liter.
A Type II MSD is commonly a biological (aerobic digestion) plant.

Type III Treatment
(All Applications)

A device designed to prevent the overboard discharge of treated or untreated sewage,
or any waste derived from sewage. Most Type III's are holding tanks,
but there are also vacuum collection systems, incineration systems,
recirculation systems and composting systems.

Washington State Marine Sanitation Laws
Any overboard discharging of untreated waste must take place 3 miles offshore!
Washington State does not currently have ‘No Discharge Zone’ laws. You may discharge TREATED (Type II) waste overboard as long as you are not in a Marina that forbids discharging of any kind. Please be aware and respect their rules and regulations.


Illegal Discharge

Section 312 of Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA), as amended (33 U.S.C. 1322), requires MSD's to prevent the discharge of untreated or inadequately treated sewage into U.S. waters.

It requires a certified operable marine sanitation device on every vessel with installed toilets. Installed toilets that are not equipped with the MSD, and that discharge raw sewage directly over the side, are illegal.

Vessels with installed toilets must install operable, certified MSD, as follows:

A: Vessels 65 feet in length and under must have a Type I, II or III device. (Type I MSD’s are still permitted on new installations because of a USCG waiver issued by Federal Register notice of Monday, 10 July 1978.

B: Vessels over 65 feet in length must have a type II or III device. Type I devices are only permitted if:

(1) The construction of the vessel was begun on or before Jan. 30th, 1975 and the MD was installed prior to Jan. 31st, 1980;

(2) The construction of the vessel was begun before Jan. 30th, 1975 and the MSD was installed before Jan. 31st, 1979 (Extended from 1978 to 1979 because of a USCG waiver issued by federal register notice of Mon. 28th Nov. 1977).


Untreated sewage is unsightly and contains disease-carrying micro-organisms from which
swimmers and water skiers can develop skin rashes, amoebic dysentary, and parasitic worm diseases.

Discharging untreated sewage can spread diseases and contaminate shellfish beds.
Shellfish can transmit nearly every water-borne pathogen to humans.
These pathogens cause diseases such as Gastrointestinal illnesses or more serious
Hepatitis, Typhoid, and Cholera.

Organic matter in sewage is decomposed in the waters, the bacteria use oxygen and
as a result, sewage in the water may deplete the water's oxygen level.
Which can affect fish population and other aquatic animals.

Example Of Type III Treatment
(orientation optional)